Friday, January 12, 2007

Out-witched!

Yesterday was drama and humour for lovers of the telenovela, la hija del jardinero. Jennifer suffered a terrible disgrace that even she, could not comprehend. Her aborted wedding to Carlos was a great mystery which she could not unravel. It was humor for me to see a 'witch' like her bewitched, and she acknowledged it. She told Marissa that the seeming coincidences of circumstances that conspired against her to terminate her elaborate wedding ceremony was WITCHCRAFT par excellence.

The Snippet 94 has the details of this drama of divine intervention. Another thing which I noted was the fact that all the people close to them were either consciously or unconsciously working to separate Alfredo and L.F. Victor who is Daniel's younger brother and should naturally have been on the side of his brother's friend Alfredo, was even encouraging Xochil to tear apart Alfredo from L.F.

Rosario and Clarita apologized to L.F and confessed that they did invite her on purpose hoping that Carlos would cancel his wedding when he sees her on his wedding day. Even, Don Fernando, Rigoberto,Vanessa and her fiance, Orlando, all agreed that it was a blessing in disguise.

Consuelo dribbled Rigo yesterday when she simply told Don that all she wanted to do was to apologize to him for her sending him to an asylum. The old man suspected that she was hiding a secret and was not just about a simple apology over asylum.That means that she still has a lot to dispense from her bag of tricks.

2 comments:

Barbara said...

Rapacciono un autravar tori para gentisse, wagine! Questoucompe ketide rom aer esta joveio? Ho in - kinese zandou marvor pero zelico nun? Ente jace giamagenemic per il sol massas nond kersar il irmate.

dr infarto said...

Barbara speaks an idiom of her own invention.

(Кракожия) is a fictional country created for the movie The Terminal starring Tom Hanks and Catherine Zeta Jones.

In the movie, Krakozhia (also misspelled "Cracozhia" or "Cacosia") is the tiniest republic in Eastern Europe and may have been a former Soviet republic. The natives speak the Krakozhian language. From January 16, 2004 to November 2004 the country was in civil war. When the war began, the President of the country was held hostage. As such, a new regime is installed, one which the United States did not recognize.

This causes problems for Viktor Navorski, a Krakozhian who is en route to New York City at the time. Landing at John F. Kennedy International Airport, he finds his passport and visa are now useless, and he can neither enter the US nor return to Krakozhia because Krakozhia has sealed its borders. As such, Viktor must stay in the airport terminal for nine months, after which peace is declared in Krakozhia and he is able to return home.

Little else is known about Krakozhia, except that there was a lot of fighting which made the international news. We hear of the "northern area" being taken by rebels. Krakozhia has a national anthem almost exactly like that of Albania save for the lyrics. Navorski's driver's license is Belarusian. One can see the words Вадзіцельскае пасведчанне (Vadzicielskaje pasviedczannie), which means driver's license in Belarusian and the name of the Belarusian city of Homel. Curiously, the Belarusian name on the driver's license is Гуліна Гульнара Надыраўна (Hulina Hulnara Nadiraŭna); presumably the Belarusian driver's license shot in the movie belonged to a Belarusian girl who immigrated to the USA [1].

The language which Hanks' character speaks in the film, "Krakozhian," is supposedly close to or a dialect of Russian to the point of mutual understanding, but is actually slightly-accented Bulgarian. Tom Hanks' wife, Rita Wilson, whose father is Bulgarian, is reported to have coached Hanks in Bulgarian in the course of the shooting of the film.

The "Krakozhia" could be an allusion to Polish (or slavic generally) immigration in the US. One of the biggest cities in Poland is Cracow, (Kraków in Polish, Cracovia in Latin), which sounds very similar to "Cracozhia". The surname "Navorski" (Naworski) is popular there.

Un saludo desde España.